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Demo Alpine Touring Skis, Snowshoes and More in Truckee!

February 13th, 2015 By   

DCIM108GOPRO

Tahoe Mountain Sports offers a complete selection of  Volkl, K2, Blizzard, G3, Coalition, Black Diamond, BCA, Mammut, Ortovox, Pieps, Dynafit, Garmont, Scott and Dynafit alpine touring and safety equipment for rental in Truckee, CA to be used Lake Tahoe, CA or around the country. All backcountry skis, telemark skis, Salomon Nordic skis (boots and poles) or MSR snowshoe rentals can be picked up and dropped off during our business hours. All rental rates are good for a 24-hour period and user of equipment must be present to rent backcountry gear.

Click here for the Tahoe Mountain Sports Outdoor Gear Rental rates.

If you would like to demo or rent something not on the list, just call (530-536-5200) and we will be happy to coordinate your outdoor adventure. All rentals or demos can be put towards the purchase price if you decide to purchase the equipment up to $150.

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Thanks Technical Equipment Cleaners (TEC)!

February 27th, 2015 By   

Technical Equipment Cleaners (TEC), located at 10607 W. River St. Suite 1D, Truckee, CA specializes in cleaning, waterproofing, & repairs for outdoor sports apparel and equipment.

TEC utilizes “Green Cleaning, NOT dry cleaning” – All water cleaning, All ECO friendly, All ways…

Learn more at tec-tahoe.com and follow them on Facebook.

Recently, #TMS employee, Kevin Snow had the misfortune of sitting on an (open) energy packet in the car after split-boarding up Tamarack Peak in the Mt. Rose backcountry. Kevin had on his new Arc’Teryx Beta AR Pants. These hyper-durable pants were not ruined but definitely needed a cleaning to get the GU off them.

These awesome pants are packable, waterproof pants featuring minimal bulk, exceptional waterproofing, and reinforced knees, seat, and lower legs to ensure a long lasting construction.

BEFORE

Enter TEC. Daniel Cates (Owner of Technical Equipment Cleaners) in Truckee, CA came to the rescue. His professional cleaning service shined brightly as he washed, brushed, washed and brushed again the incredible Beta AR Pants.

Thank you to TEC for bringing Kevin’s pants back to life!

AFTER

Watch the video below to see the aftermath of Kevin’s mishap and our tour up Tamarack Peak!

Five Skis Tested for 2015-16

February 24th, 2015 By   

The #TMS Crew headed to Mt. Rose Ski Area for the WWSRA (Western Winter Sports Rep Association) Demo Days. FIVE AWESOME SKIS FROM THE FUTURE WERE TESTED. 

READ MORE IF YOU LIKE COOL SKIS…

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AB and KS at Mt. Rose

Nik Somers, Kevin Snow and I got out and tested new skis on what was the first major storm cycle to hit the Tahoe area since the first part of the season. Mt. Rose received around 40″ of new snow and 15-25″ at its base. Then, the wind came in and made things interesting. We skied every conceivable type of snow condition (powder, blown powder, ice pellets, crust and groomed runs).

Five skis were reviewed and tested.

One ski will likely make a return to the wall, while four others might make a grand entrance next fall…

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Blizzard Zero G 108 and Zero G 98 Skis

SKI TEST #1: Blizzard Zero G 108

Test Size and Weight: Length – 185cm, Weight 1,750 grams (per ski)
Binding: Marker Kingpin
Boot: Dynafit Mercury
- Beta: Lengths: 171, 178, 185 cm | Sidecut: 136-108-122mm | Radius: [185 cm] 27.0m  | Construction: Sandwich Compound | Sidewall; Carbon Drive Technology.

From the Blizzard Skis 2015-2016 Catalog…ZeroG-108Diagram

Carbon Drive is the integration of a 3D unidirectional carbon fiber frame with an ultra-lightweight palowina woodcore construction. The carbon frame’s 3D geometry guarantees optimal flex and torsional rigidity. The end result is industry leading lightweight products that deliver a level of downhill performance that is unprecedented in the world of alpine touring and backcountry skiing.

REVIEW: The major buzz words in ski technology have included carbon. While carbon offers great rigidity and stiffness, it often doesn’t give with each turn as much, which translates into a ski that needs to really be driven (read: BUCKLE UP). The new Blizzard Zero G is a good mix of both playfulness and a hard-charger. A super nimble and lightweight option for the backcountry enthusiast, this ski is a true testament to the advanced technology and construction found in many ski options today.With a mixed bag of conditions to ski in on the demo day at Mt. Rose, the Blizzard Zero G really shined. The one con in the ski I tested was that you really need to stay on it. Just like most of Blizzard’s great line-up of skis, this new beauty needs attention. Drive it and stay on the gas and you’ll have a great day.

Final word: A solid winner and “go to” ski for any conditions. Look for them on the TMS ski wall in 2016.

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Salomon Q-BC Lab Skis (2015 Top-Sheet Graphic)

SKI TEST #2: Salomon Q-BC Lab

Test Size and Weight: Length – 184cm, Weight 1,800 grams (per ski)
Binding: Dynafit TLT Radical ST 2 AT Ski Binding
Boot: Dynafit Mercury
- Beta: Lengths: 176, 184 cm | Sidecut: 140-114-128mm | Radius: [176cm] 21m, [184cm] 24m | Construction: Sandwich ABS, SidewallAn exception balance of touring efficiency and downhill performance, the Salomon Q BC Lab Skis are a full wood core with ultra-light CFX Superfiber reinforcement for the ultimate ski experience. The perfect balance of downhill performance and touring efficiency.  Salomon’s revolutionary, ultra light CFX Superfiber reinforcement and a full woodcore combine for stability, control and response not found on other lightweight touring skis.

*Editor’s note: This ski is not changing for the 2015-16 ski season (just the top-sheet). If you’d like to seize the day and grab a pair of your own, click HERE to purchase a pair!

REVIEW: This ski is the epitome of Salomon’s commitment to being a pure mountain company. A great soft snow (and powder) ski, the Q-BC Lab shines when used in variable to ideal conditions. Although it has a 114mm waist, this ski is surprisingly nimble. The full-length wood laminates combined with the inherent backcountry ski features such as “free hook taper” (diminishing hooking up in powder) and the built in skin tail clips make this ski a machine to not only easily climb mountains, but have the confidence to ski like you want to on the ride down.

Final word: A great backcountry option, the Salomon Q-BC Lab is a great decision for those in need of a lightweight 4×4 ski.

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K2 Pinnacle 105 Skis

SKI TEST #3: K2 Pinnacle 105

Test Size and Weight: Length – 184cm, Weight N/A
Binding: Marker Griffon
Boot: K2 Pinnacle 130
- Beta: Lengths: 170, 177, 184, 191 cm | Sidecut: 137-105-121mm | Radius: [184cm]19 m | Construction: Triaxial Braid, Hyrbitech Sidewall, Metal Laminate

The Pinnacle 105 is positioned in the middle of the new Freeride series as the do-anything, go-anywhere, ski everything, quiver of one. Even the most confident skiers will benefit from the lightweight Nanolite core. Helping navigate through trees or floating in power, as much as the solid and supportive wood cores with metal laminate over the edges when charging firmer, variable snow.

REVIEW: The many technologies that K2 has seamlessly blended into this new ski are evident in that you never really need to think about it when arcing turns, bashing bumps or smearing soft snow! The diminished swing weight and torsional stiffness allow this ski to effortlessly turn, glide and rule the entire mountain. I would recommend this ski for anyone that loves to ski the whole mountain with confidence.

Final Word: The Pinnacle 105 is your quiver killer for 2015-16!

K2-Pinnacle-95

SKI TEST #4: K2 Pinnacle 95

Test Size and Weight: Length – 184cm, Weight N/A
- Binding: Marker Griffon
- Boot: K2 Spyne
Beta: Lengths: 170, 177, 184, 191 cm | Sidecut: 132-95-115mm | Radius: [184cm]17 m | Construction: Triaxial Braid, Hyrbitech Sidewall, Metal Laminate

Attack the resort in any snow condition. The Pinnacle 95 incorporates the new K2 Konic Technology with a high performance, lightweight Nanolite center core for added ease and control, while the wood core and metal laminate along the perimeter of the ski engages all the power, strength and stability needed for all mountain dominance.

REVIEW: The K2 Pinnacle 95 is nearly the same as the larger 105, but much more nimble. Grab a pair of these if you prefer a Ginsu knife over a machete. 

Final word: Rinse. Lather. Repeat. This ski does it all!

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SKI TEST #5: Volkl 100 Eight

- Test Size and Weight: Length – 184cm, Weight N/A
- Binding: Marker Griffon
- Boot: K2 Spyne 130
- Beta: Lengths: 173, 181, 189 cm | Sidecut: 141-108-124mm | Radius: [173cm] 19.7m, [181cm] 22m, [189cm] 24.5m | Construction: 3D Ridge, Tough Box | Core: Multi Layer Wood

An all time favorite ski, the Volkl Gotama is being replaced this upcoming winter season (2015-16) with a similar yet very new ski, the 100 Eight. This ski features a new construction from Volkl called the 3D Ridge. This layup offers a lightweight, lively ski feel – 141-108-124mm shape, flat tail design, Full Rocker, Smart Early Taper and an open (20 to 22m) radius combine for a smooth, playful ride for a variety of conditions, from deep powder to groomers.

REVIEW: Although I am sad to see the heralded Volkl Gotama become extinct, the future is always brighter in regards to new technology in ski construction, shape, camber profile and rocker. The 100 Eight is no exception to progression. Out with the old, in with the NEW. This ski does EVERYTHING (well,  maybe not ski moguls that well). I can’t wait to rip up the in-bounds terrain, drop cliffs, ski powder and even take this versatile ski into the backcountry. 

Final word: A lightweight, 4×4 machine, the Volkl 100 Eight is yet another great option to slim your ski quiver to ONE.

 

Salomon Rocker 2 100 Skis – Review

February 24th, 2015 By   

This post comes from Colorado native Tiffany Hansen, a guest blogger (snowboardmountaineer.com) and Boulder, CO resident who recently relocated back from Southern California to be closer to the mountains, the snow and the great Colorado outdoors. When Tiffany isn’t working on behalf of her clients, she is finding new adventures in the backcountry and fine-tuning her collection of backcountry gear. Watch for more gear reviews and fun reading from Tiffany and other Ambassadors of Tahoe Mountain Sports.

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Tiffany Hansen

Salomon Rocker 2 100 Skis

*What: Solomon Rocker2 100, 170cm

*Where: I have owned these skis since September 2014 and have put them to test on multiple varieties of Intermountain Colorado snow both on and off-piste ranging from the early season crust of Andrew’s Glacier, Dragontail and the Apron in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) to the fresh-dry powder of Terrain Park (RMNP Lake Haiyaha area), the packed and fresh powder of Breckenridge, and fresh powder on top of hard pack at the East Portal trail up to Forest Lakes. These skis have traversed the Colorado Front Range and have given me the confidence to take them into the backcountry of the San Juans for some serious spring backcountry adventures.

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*Pros: The Rocker2 is a lightweight ride and an ideal all-mountain ski, having proven itself worthy of handling the gravely diverse snow conditions found throughout any given day in the Colorado backcountry. I love groomers and packed powder and prefer a ski that can effortlessly carve the hard snow. The Full Woodcore offers optimum stability and rebound, while maximizing ski to snow contact while filtering vibrations. The twin rocker tips and the loose camber underfoot glide through turns and don’t get grabby and allowed me to maintain control at higher speeds, even though technically this ski is built for lower speeds. The hook-free taper of the big rocker tip moves the skis widest point to the middle and performs well in dry powder, allowing me to keep the ski flat to easily float through pleasure turns. Conversely, I gain maximum control if I roll and apply power and engage a hard edge for sharper handling. The ski is immediately responsive delivering impressive terrain adaptation making it a blast to ride in the conditions I prefer the most.

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Product Features:
Twin Rocker shape, full wood core and full sandwich construction, the Rocker 2 100 is equally at home in the park & pipe as it is off piste in powder. One-stop-shopping for both freeriders and the less acrobatic on and off piste adventures looking for an energetic, all-mountain ski that does it all.

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Technologies include: 

- Full Woodcore: full-length wood laminates, from tip to tail, giving optimum stability and rebound, while maximizing ski to snow contact and filtering vibrations

- Full Sandwich Walls: laminate construction with fll length ABS sidewalls give extraordinary smooth ski/snow contact and a great terrain adaptation. Laminated construction enables us to combine optimum materials layers for targeted performance

- Pulse Pad: a layer of rubber all along the edges and in critical zones of the ski for smoother ride & improved ski-snow contact

- Hook Free Taper: the widest point in the sidecut tapers in toward the tip earlier for less drag and hooking in powder. Swing weight is also reduced making the ski even more maneuverable in difficult snow

- Wide Edges: thicker edges for increased durability and improved shock resistance

- Total Edge Reinforcement: fiber reinforcement directly on top of edges improves durability, edge grip, and shock resistance

- Twin Rocker: long, medium height rocker profile at the tip and tail enables easy pivoting with maximum flotation and maneuverability in powder. The ski retains a long contact zone on edge with camber in the middle of the ski for stability and edge grip

- Carve Zone: the traditionally cambered section of twin rocker skis where the sidecut is focused on more power, energy and edge grip

- Glossy

ProductSpecs

*Cons: These skis have proven to be more difficult in both resort and backcountry “mashed-potato” or soft powder due to the narrow waist. These conditions are more easily skiable with a fat ski. However, given all the other technology packed in to the Rocker 2 100 this is a minor grievance.

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*Suggestions: It’s hard to say what modifications would improve this ski. Increasing the width to accommodate soft powder would have a negative influence on carving performance. Unless you’ve got quite the quiver, for an all-mountain ski that covers many conditions, I feel this ski has hit the target and I wouldn’t change a thing.

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*Summary: Solomon Rocker 2 100 are worthy of their mid-range price tag. The twin rocker/camber combo delivers an impressive all-mountain performance on most every terrain that is difficult to come by in a single pair of skis, especially in this price point. The next offering in this profile is the K2 Annex 98 Freeride at a slightly higher price point. However, you don’t get the twin rocker which is attractive to the new-style skier. If you do not want to have to pack multiple pairs of skis, this is definitely your best bet for the money!

Salomon Rocker 2 100 Skis
Salomon Rocker 2 100 Skis
Sale Price: $479.95
Arva Neo Avalanche Beacon
Arva Neo Avalanche Beacon
Sale Price: $287.96

Pieps DSP Sport Avalanche Beacon – Review

February 3rd, 2015 By   

This post comes from Shaun Nauman, a blogger (snowboardmountaineer.com) and Boulder, CO resident. When Shaun isn’t studying snow hydrology and forecasting avalanches, the AIARE Level 1 Avalanche Instructor is finding new adventures in the backcountry on his splitboard. Watch for more gear reviews and fun reading from Shaun and other Ambassadors of Tahoe Mountain Sports.

ShaunNauman

Shaun Nauman

*What:  Pieps DSP Sport Avalanche Beacon
*Where:  We put this beacon through multiple scenarios on the snow, including signal search, course search, and fine search. The Pieps DSP Sport locked on to the ‘victim’ transmitting beacon at remarkable distances. The beacon was put through the paces with various flux lines as well. Beacons transmit a signal on flux lines as shown in the graphics below. This beacon was tested side-by-side with the Pieps DSP Classic and numerous other beacons at AIARE ITC (American Institute of Avalanche Research and Education Instructor Training Course) and numerous trials in the backcountry at Rocky Mountain National Park.

pieps_cover

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Get Active ;) this Valentine’s Day

January 28th, 2015 By   

This post comes from TMS Ambassador – Coral Taylor, an avid mountain biker, yogi, snowboarder and outdoor enthusiast living in Truckee, CA. Follow @c_ros on Instagram for rad photos of her adventures around Lake Tahoe and beyond. In addition to getting after it on the snow, Coral is also a Team LUNAChix Tahoe Mountain Bike Team Ambassador!

So, it’s almost Valentine’s Day, and if you want to rail against the Hallmark establishment and write this off as a bogus holiday that encourages consumer spending, blood diamonds, and making singles feel less-than, all the power to you. In that case, consider February 14 to be Lupercalia and howl at the injustice.

However, if you want to celebrate the day with your significant other, there a lot of fun, and free, or inexpensive ideas out there that involve spending time together getting active, not just eating an over-priced dinner at a busy restaurant or buying each other jewelry and cuff links. (Bonus: physical activity and conquering fears lead to increased libido, saving you money on those oysters!)

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Hydro Flask 40 and 18oz. Review

January 24th, 2015 By   

This post comes from Shaun Nauman, a blogger (snowboardmountaineer.com) and Boulder, CO resident. When Shaun isn’t studying snow hydrology and forecasting avalanches, the AIARE Level 1 Avalanche Instructor is finding new adventures in the backcountry on his splitboard. Watch for more gear reviews and fun reading from Shaun and other Ambassadors of Tahoe Mountain Sports.

ShaunNauman

Shaun Nauman

*What: Hydro Flask, 40oz & 18oz
*Where: San Juan Mountains, Silverton, CO. Summit of Red Mountain #3 and McMillan Peak. An epic few days of training and the Hydro Flask made it all the better! I used the smaller 16oz Hydro Flask for a hot drink, and the 40oz with a hydration hose for water. From past experience, bladders and Nalgene bottles will often freeze while digging snow profiles at high elevations.

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(Photo: Shaun Nauman)

*Pros – The Hydro Flask certainly keeps liquids warm. Temperatures ranged from a low of 3 F to a high of 30 F, but the Hydro Flask kept liquids warm while doing snow profiles for many hours. Gear in this type of setting takes a beating, and the Hydro Flask is tough as nails and pulled through without a scratch. Hydro Flask proudly states it will keep liquids hot for 12 hours, and liquids cold for 24 hours. I can attest that the Hydro Flask kept liquids warm for the nine plus hours we were out digging snow profiles and skinning up to elevations above 12,000’ in January.

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(Photos: Shaun Nauman)

2*Hydro Flask Test: I was so amazed with the Hydro Flask I decided to set up a bench test of sorts on my return from the San Juan Mountains to see just how well it performed against a regular stainless steel drinking bottle. The first test was performed to measure heat loss from a hot drink. I started at a temperature of 140 F and graphed the heat loss of the Hydro Flask against a regular stainless steel bottle.

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Next, I measured the cold loss from cold drink. I started with the liquid at a temperature of 35F and graphed the same result of the Hydro Flask against the stainless bottle.

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(Photo: Shaun Nauman)

Yes, that is a snow profile thermometer – which worked marvelous for this test.

While the Hydro Flask stands up to it’s claim for keeping liquid hot, it really shines by keeping liquid cool. After 12 hours there was a net temperature loss of less than one degree! Many people also use the Hydro Flask as a beer growler, it will not only keep the brew cold, but will also keep the carbonation intact.

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*Cons – None. The Hydro Flask outperformed in real world applications.

The secret to the Hydro Flask is the vacuum insulated double wall, which means there is an absence of matter between the two stainless steel walls. Since there is no matter, the outside temperature of the flask has a difficult time affecting the contents inside the flask. The durability is outstanding too. The finish on Hydro Flasks is a tough powder coat finish, constructed of 18/8 stainless steel. The nice thing about stainless is that it is resistant to absorbing taste, odor and bacteria. So that chai from last week won’t linger in the realms of today’s drink.

You can also get an optional sipping top on the wide mouth Hydro Flasks. Since the threads are the same as a Nalgene bottle, you can easily interchange a hydration hose system to the Hydro Flask.

The Hydro Flask is a year-round piece of gear that is absolutely amazing. In the winter months it will keep your drinks hot, and in the summer months you can enjoy cold liquids after many hours, or even a cold brew at the summit.

Getting Put in Your Place by Old Man Mountain

January 23rd, 2015 By   

This post comes from Chris Cloyd, a TMS Ambassador and lover of endurance sports. When Chris isn’t training for his next big run in the mountains or out exploring the Eastern Sierra on bike, he’s managing the Performance Training Center by Julia Mancuso. Watch for more race reports, gear reviews and fun reading from Chris and other Ambassadors of Tahoe Mountain Sports.

Old Men Are Smarter Than You: Getting Put In Our Place by Old Man Mountain

Wisdom is a hell of a lot harder to come by than “smarts”, as I learned this past weekend. “Smarts” (as far as this writer is concerned) can be learned in a classroom or a library, and are observed fairly easily. Wisdom, in my opinion, needs to be learned the hard way – through experience and shortcomings and successes and failures. The burned hand learns best.

This relentless drought in the Tahoe has brought out some interesting coping mechanisms – some of my friends are taking up new sports, some are catching up on reading, some are going surfing on the coast. My friend Steven Benesi and I have resorted to drinking too much coffee, poring over maps, picking out peaks that look interesting, and figuring out ways to run/climb/scramble/posthole our way up to the summit. It’s a rewarding exercise, keeps us in shape, and (fortunately for us) there is no shortage of awesome mountain terrain around our neck of the woods. This past weekend the object of our desire was Old Man Mountain, down outside of Cisco Grove/Emigrant Gap. Many of you will recognize this peak from your drive up 80 from the Bay:

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(Photo: Chris Cloyd)

We decided to start our run from the Lake Spaulding area (off of Highway 20) in an effort to add some good running miles to our approach. The most commonly used approach starts at Eagle Lakes Rd (off of I-80), but that would limit our trail time/running window to just a few miles on a jeep road. Who wants that? Being the extremely intrepid individuals that we are (read: overaggressive and reckless) we added about 7 miles of running to the front and back of our planned route to keep things interesting. For those of you scoring at home, this choice would come back to bite us.

We started out from the trailhead around 9 AM, freshly caffeinated and fueled up. The running was wonderful here, and the singletrack navigated the forest microclimate in style. It’s always so much fun running in the foothills(ish) for a bunch of reasons, but the stark contrast to the granite and alpine terrain up here in the Tahoe Basin is my favorite. We made it to Fordyce Falls with no difficulty – the water is moving down there right now!

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Fordyce Falls (Photo: Chris Cloyd)

From here, things got a little sideways. Due in part to a spur trail that was pseudo-marked and then covered in snow (combined with some amateur navigating/map skills on my part) we found ourselves fjording (Oregon Trail shoutout!) Granite Creek and scaling waterfalls in an attempt to get ourselves back on the correct trail. This consumed some time, but it was well worth our detour to find some pretty awesome waterfalls that aren’t on any of our maps:

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Flexing at the Falls (Photo: Chris Cloyd)

Upon rediscovering the trail, we had to backtrack a bit to rejoin the trail to Eagle Lakes. Some highly pleasurable running followed, and we arrived at Eagle Lakes just an hour or so behind schedule. Of course, this was where we could have started our day, but we chose to be more awesome and add some more to our adventure. After all, it’s all about time spent in the mountains with friends, isn’t it? We filtered some water at one the Eagle Lakes (never leave home without one – I love my Katadyn MyBottle Water Purifier Water Bottle) and got back to work. The next leg of our approach was all on the Fordyce Jeep Trail, which is technically an OHV route. That being said, I can’t believe people drive this thing. It’s a mangled sliver of boulders and pools and ice floes that’s barely navigable on foot. Steven and I actually caught and passed a guy on a dirt bike (yes, with a motor) – that’s how slow the going is on this route. To our surprise, we came across a few guys out with their trucks (and obligatory guns and beer) about 3 miles into this leg of the trail. We kindly asked them to shoot in the other direction until we returned from the mountain. About 3.5 miles in we hit the Fordyce Creek (read: river) crossing, and were stunned to discover about 75 feet of knee-to-hip deep water running across our route. Undeterred, we scrambled up the southern bank and bushwhacked/postholed our way upriver (not pleasant) for an interminable amount of time before coming across a felled tree that served as a natural bridge across the river. We successfully crossed, but this detour really killed our time. We were about 2 hours behind schedule now, and light was going to prove to be an issue. Consider the going was so easy to this point, we were hesitant to commit to headlamp running for any notable amount of time on the back end of our run. Nevertheless, we pressed on.

We reached our designated cross-country departure point, about a quarter mile to the southwest of the foot of Old Man and started on a direct route through the swaths of forest and manzanita. For the uninitiated, manzanita is the horrible plant that basically reaches up, grabs your entire body, slows your pace to a crawl, and is entirely unavoidable in certain patches of the Sierra. It’s probably responsible for the drought, and is probably cancerous, too. Weirdly enough, this experience with manzanita was no different, and we got to within throwing distance of the start of the real ascent to Old Man Mountain’s summit before we decided to call off our bid. It was almost 3 pm by this time, and we were sure to lose daylight on the way down if we pushed on to the top. Having made the decision that we weren’t comfortable with our return route in the dark, we did the only prudent thing we could: we stopped on a nice rock outcropping and made some coffee. Rule #1: Never attempt mountain adventure without a Jetboil, French press, and hand-ground coffee. Any time you can stop in the middle of nowhere (not one sign of human development/civilization was visible from our perch) and enjoy a cup of coffee with friends, you’ve got to do it.

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Ahh, what a great view to be enjoyed with a great cup of coffee! (Photo: Chris Cloyd)

This brings me to Rule #2: Never attempt mountain adventure without a support team – in this case, our loving girlfriends. We contacted them using my Spot Gen3 GPS tracker (an awesome tool that allows you to send pre-drafted messages to a list of contacts at the push of a button even when you don’t have cell service) and kindly asked (begged) them to meet us at the Eagle Lakes interstate exit at 6 PM. This was our contingency plan, and we were thrilled to have had the forethought to develop a retreat plan and organize logistics for exactly this kind of scenario. We finished our coffee, tipped our hats to Old Man, and retreated back down the Fordyce Jeep Trail all the way back to Eagle Lakes and our predetermined extraction point. Fortunately for Steven and I, our girlfriends are the best in the whole world. Not only were able to pick us up, they brought hot tea and cold beer.

Rule #3: Always have contingency plans in place for your mountain adventures, and prepare: the separation is in the preparation.

Rule #4: ALWAYS take your significant other out to dinner and be liberal with massages after he/she saves you from your own belligerent overestimation of your own ability in the mountains.

All in all, we bit off more than we could chew on this day, but we enjoyed a great day in the mountains, nobody was hurt, and we learned a ton.

We’ll be back for you, Old Man, and we’ll be wiser.

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Heading home (Photo: Chris Cloyd)

Après Snow Yoga

January 21st, 2015 By   
(Photo: Coral Taylor)

(Photo: Coral Taylor)

This post comes from TMS Ambassador – Coral Taylor, an avid mountain biker, yogi, snowboarder and outdoor enthusiast living in Truckee, CA. Follow @c_ros on Instagram for rad photos of her adventures around Lake Tahoe and beyond. In addition to getting after it on the snow, Coral is also a Team LUNAChix Tahoe Mountain Bike Team Ambassador!

Winter is here! And even though the snow is not, per se, “epic”, it’s still fun to get out there and enjoy it! Whether your sport is snowboarding, skiing, XC skiing, snowshoeing, or backcountry exploring, your body and mind will appreciate some post-effort recovery.

After a day (or even a couple hours) of playing in the snow, I like to incorporate a little bit of yoga to help my muscles relax and to release any tension I might have (from dodging tourists on mountain run, making backcountry decisions, and driving to and fro).

I have found the following yoga poses to be beneficial in stretching the key muscles engaged, as well as improving strength, coordination and proprioception.

Dancer aka Lord of the Dance, Natarajasana

Dancer (7)

(Photo: Coral Taylor)

A modified version of this pose will allow you to stretch the quadriceps, the psoas, and work on your balance, without putting too much strain on your back. This is fun to try in the parking lot, once you have your snow boots on (ski boots NOT recommended due to their low coefficient of friction).

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It’s What’s Inside that Counts: Berghaus Jackets

January 16th, 2015 By   

The name Berghaus is a literal translation of the German for ‘mountain centre’. In 1966, outdoor wear as we know it didn’t really exist. Then Berghaus came along. It all began when climbers and mountaineers Peter Lockey and Gordon Davison from the North East of England, frustrated by what they saw as a lack of decent outdoor gear, decided to import and sell their own. The world of outdoor wear was changing and Berghaus was leading the way. More than 40 years at the forefront of outdoor performance wear and Berghaus is still innovating. Exploring new territories and developing a clothing range that helps climbers do the same, Berghaus continues to lead where others follow.

Pioneered by Berghaus, Hydrodown™ is a revolutionary new take on nature’s greatest insulator.

Whether you’re bedding down on damp ground or climbing in less than perfect conditions, this breakthrough technology from Berghaus keeps you and your kit dry, warm, comfortable and light.

By treating goose down with a durable water repellent (DWR), Berghaus has created a material that resists rain longer, dries quicker, and retains its insulation even when it’s damp. And just like untreated down, it has amazing warmth-to weight ratio which no synthetic alternative has come close to matching.

Developed with extensive input from their athletes, Hydrodown™ technology has been tested in some of the most extreme temperatures all over the globe.

Key features:
Natural down – without the downsides

Just like untreated down, Hydrodown™ is compressible for easy packing, breathable, and has that amazing warmth-to-weight ratio that no synthetic alternative has come close to matching. But it also boasts three amazing attributes that you won’t find in natural goose down:

Repels moisture:
Every cluster of Hydrophobic Down undergoes innovative water-repellent treatment, so it absorbs significantly less water, keeping you dry and your kit light.

Retains loft:
Hydrophobic Down’s specially treated clusters of high fill-power goose down won’t collapse in wet conditions – so it retains its ‘loft’ and keeps you warm.

Recovers fast:
Unlike regular down, which becomes matted and loses insulation when it rains, Hydrodown™ dries out quickly. Tests show that it recovers 80 per cent of its loft, even after three minutes fully immersed in water. So with Hydrodown™ in your kit, you can keep on going – even after a storm.

Developed in the lab and tested in the field by leading athletes, Hydrodown™ has you covered –whatever kind of adventure you live for.

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TMS is proud to carry Berghaus clothing for extreme outdoor sports. Check out our selection of Berghaus jackets and Berghaus fleece layers that perform for the best, better than the rest.

RamcheHyperDown

Taking it to New Heights in the Berghaus Ramche Hyper Down Jacket (Photo: Copyright – Berghaus Comunity Blog)

Designed for high altitude conditions, the Ramche Hyper Down Jacket uses a three zone body mapping to best insulate and protect within a wind and water-resistant lightweight shell.

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Ulvetannahybrid-US

Durability and breathability are spotlighted in the rugged warmth and insulation of the Berghaus Ulvetanna Hybrid Jacket, with exceptional protection from even the harshest conditions.

Superior insulation in a flattering style, the Berghaus Scorch Micro Fleece Jacket makes a great mid-layer on the mountain and fashionable outer layer for daily life.

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